Warning: This post contains salacious tomato pictures!

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Yes, my tomatoes are showing!
After reading over at Heavy Petal about how Andrea was helping to quicken the ripening process for her tomatoes, I decided to give the tomato strip tease a try. I removed all the off shoot branches and suckers that I honestly should have gotten to sooner. I also removed most of the canopy leaves that had been sheltering the green tomatoes.
I hadn’t realized there were so many packed in there!
Certainly this has taught me to try to plant more early tomatoes. I will be scouring the catalogues this winter for some early heirloom tomatoes (feel free to educate me, if you have one I just have to have one on my list!) This type of foresight would have come in really handy earlier this year. There is only a month until I officially go on vacation. I’m running out of time, and these bad boys ( and girls) have been teasing me for too long!

There is a little more colour in them since last time I peeked. Indeed, with the leaves gone I noticed that the object of my desire is actually larger than I had first anticipated.
Much larger. This Brandywine is heavy! I’ve got my eye firmly fixed on this one! Notice that my giant hand practically disappears behind it! It’s just that big!

Drool!
Hopefully with a little sunshine, and with the plants energies re focused on their fruit, these will be ready for harvest soon!Tomatoes anyone?

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8 comments on “Warning: This post contains salacious tomato pictures!

  1. Marguerite on said:

    oh my those tomatoes look lovely. Good for you for trying heirlooms. I'm hoping to start heirlooms from seed next year but like you am looking for something with a short season. If your green tomatoes don't ripen in time you can try picking them and placing them in a bag with a ripening banana. The banana, or other ripe fruit, give off gases which encourage the tomatoes to change colour.

  2. danger garden on said:

    So many beautiful tomatoes! Contrary to what the weather people are saying (what do they know anyway!?) I feel we are going to have a nice long mild Fall (when it actually gets here…remember we are technically still in Summer!(yes I'm still beating that drum)) so your tomatoes will have time to ripen!

  3. @Marguerite thats a good tip! I'll keep in in mind if the strip tease doesn't work!@Danger Garden I love your drumbeat lady! My problem is I don't have time to wait. 21 days and counting, and then I won't be here to harvest them. Sure they would make my neighbors and family left behinds quite happy, but I'm a little greedy with these tomatoes! So much hard work put into them this year, I want to enjoy the fruits of my labour before I flee for warmer places! !

  4. Stevie from GardenTherapy.ca on said:

    Laura, I start Siletz Organic early tomatoes from West Coast Seeds every year and they do great. I have about 30 or so ripening on 3 tidy bushes right now, and a freezer full of them. I start the seeds in February and set them out in mid-April under cloches. It works like a dream. I also grow Gold Nugget and Red Zebra which ripen really early, and the rest (green zebra, sweetheart grape, isis candy, black russian, pink brandywine, Goliath, sungold, patio, la roma, etc) I am also stripping so they ripen. I save my seeds every year too so I'm happy to share some with you.

  5. @Stevie I know I responded on twitter, but I'll do so here as well. I would love to do some sort of seed swap. A local gardener GTG would be fun!

  6. Those brandywine look good! I pruned all the suckers this year, only leaving one main stem. Previous years I never pruned. I think it helped make bigger tomatoes but they still took forever to ripen. Much like yourself I need to plant more early producing varieties. Siletz is a good one for an early producer. Most early producers are hybrid, nothing wrong with them!

  7. Mary C. on said:

    ok, you've done it *TOMATOENVY!!!*

  8. Pingback: Sweet Cherry Tomatoes, & Other Fantastic Ways to Avoid Late Blight! | The Dandelion Wrangler

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